The Gilmore

Join pianists Katherine Chi and Aleksandar Madžar as they perform one of the most challenging and controversial masterworks of the 20th century: Karlheinz Stockhausen’s Mantra for two pianos, percussion, and electronics. This infrequently-performed piece illustrates Stockhausen’s method of creating a “mirroring effect” between the acoustically produced piano sounds and their electronically produced counterparts. Expect to have your concept of music and power of concentration tested!

A pre-concert talk by Beau Bothwell, Assistant Professor of Music at Kalamazoo College, will be held Monday, May 2 at 12 PM in the Epic Theatre at the Epic Center. Free to ticket holders.

Katherine Chi

Katherine Chi

Pianist Katherine Chi, firmly established as one of Canada’s fastest rising stars, has performed throughout Europe and North America to great acclaim. “Ms Chi displayed a keen musical intelligence and a powerful arsenal of technique” notes The New York Times. Recent and upcoming performances include her debuts with the Tallahassee and Modesto Symphony Orchestras, concerto appearances with the Vancouver Symphony, Edmonton Symphony and collaborations at the Gilmore Festival and the Library of Congress.

Sought after as a concerto soloist of musical and technical distinction, Ms. Chi is noted for the breadth of her repertoire. While hailed for her interpretations of Mozart, she is also acclaimed for performances of major romantic and twentieth century concertos. “…the most sensational but, better, the most unfailingly cogent and compelling Prokofiev’s Third I have heard in years” writes The Globe and Mail. And when Katherine Chi recreated Stockhausen’s landmark work, Mantra, for two pianos and electronics the Boston Globe wrote “when the superb pianists Katherine Chi and Aleksandar Madžar took on the challenge at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum on Sunday, it was a welcome opportunity: courtside seats at the creation.” “Chi and Madžar were ensconced among percussion, microphones, and MIDI controllers…, the form unfolding like a venerable suite even as it pushes the modernist envelope.”

Aleksandar Madzar

Aleksandar Madžar

Born in Belgrade in 1968, Aleksandar Madžar first studied piano with Gordana Matinovic, Arbo Valdma and Eliso Virsaladze in Belgrade and Moscow, then with Edouard Mirzoian at the Strasbourg Conservatory and in Brussels with Daniel Blumenthal. He now holds professorships at the Royal Flemish Conservatoire, Brussels and the Hochschule für Musik und Theater Bern.

Aleksandar Madžar has given solo recitals in Berlin (Philharmonie), London, Rome, Florence, Milan, Hamburg, Duisburg and on tour in Japan and in Columbia. He is a regular guest artist at the festivals of Bad Kissingen, Schleswig Holstein, the Ivo Pogorelich Festival at Bad Wörishofen, Klavier Festival Ruhr, Davos, Roque d’Antheron, Salzburg, Sintra and Aldeburgh. Of his prize in the 1996 Leeds Piano Competition Gerald Larner of The Times described Madžar as ‘the most imaginative musician among the 1996 finalists’. The Leeds competition propelled Madžar onto the UK scene where he also became a sought after soloist with the Royal and BBC Philharmonics, BBC Scottish Symphony, Scottish Chamber Orchestra and BBC National Orchestra of Wales, as well as throughout Europe and Asia working with Paavo Berglund, Ivan Fischer, Paavo Järvi, Carlos Kalmar, John Nelson, Libor Pesek, André Previn, Andris Nelsons and the late Marcello Viotti.

Madžar is a regular guest artist at the festivals of Bad Kissingen, Schleswig Holstein, the Ivo Pogorelich Festival at Bad Wörishofen, Klavier Festival Ruhr, Davos, Roque d’Antheron, Salzburg, Sintra and Aldeburgh. His discography includes the two Chopin piano concertos, with the Frankfurt Radio Symphony and Dmitri Kitaenko for BMG/Classic FM (1997), for the French label Arion (1999) a disc of Chabrier’s music for two pianos and, working regularly with cellist Louise Hopkins, a disc of Elliot Carter, Rachmaninov and Schnittke for the Swedish label Intim Musik.